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It's Time For a Fashion Revolution

This week is Fashion Revolution Week. On the anniversary of the 2013 Rana Plaza collapse in Bangladesh, which killed 1,138 people and injured many more, Fashion Revolution asks millions of people to come together and demand a safer, more ethical and transparent fashion industry.



This week is Fashion Revolution Week. On the anniversary of the 2013 Rana Plaza collapse in Bangladesh, a preventable tragedy which killed 1,138 people (80% of whom were women) and injured many more, Fashion Revolution—a global movement which campaigns for systemic change in the fashion industry— asks millions of people to come together and demand safer, more ethical and transparent fashion industry.


Think fashion has nothing to do with you and is a trivial topic? We all wear clothes, everyday. Our consumer choices have an impact on people and the planet. The fashion industry is one of the most polluting and wasteful industries. And it has a big problem with transparency and accountability, with widespread exploitation of people working in the supply chain, forced labour and human slavery. In garment factories across South Asia and India millions of workers—mainly women—work gruelling long hours, for low wages often in unsafe and squalid working conditions, to make your fast fashion (and some high-end brands too). Jeans, tees, summer dresses, bags and shoes which end up in your wardrobe, and inevitably, after a short life, in landfill.

Global free trade agreements have made it easy for brands to make their products where labour is cheaper, and workers have little social protection and are paid impoverishing wages—if anything at all. It has also made it possible for fast fashion to become the global phenomenon that it is. Brands like Century21, Zara and H&M built their businesses around making of-the-moment looks at rock-bottom prices. As a result, “competition for low prices and quick turnaround” has led to “globally complex and opaque supply chains” according to a KnowTheChain report. Not to mention a lack of responsibility and accountability.



There is a massive humanitarian crisis going on right now. As Covid-19 cripple