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Interview: Kit Willow, KitX

Australian fashion designer Kit Willow combined her love of fashion and the environment to create KitX, spurring her to the forefront of the fashion sustainability movement in Australia.


“I strongly believe in a better world, through the simple mantra of making women look and feel beautiful, without harming our planet, so everyone can win.”

After ten years at the helm of WILLOW, a fashion label she started in 2003 at age 23, Melbourne-born designer Kit Willow reinvented herself with KitX, a fashion brand with sustainability woven into its DNA.

With KitX, Willow combined her love of fashion and the environment spurring her to the forefront of the fashion sustainability movement in Australia. Using eco-friendly materials and production processes, as well as paying close attention to her supply chain, KitX produces pieces that are sexy and effortlessly cool, as well as kind to the planet.

While Willow has always been a nature lover, it was a chance encounter with former CEO to Puma, Jochen Zeitz, that sparked a deeper journey into researching the environmental impact of fashion. Fashion’s supply chain is murky, from child labour, polluting dyes and chemicals that poison rivers and ecosystems, pesticides sprayed on crops, and excessive water use for cotton. Willow set out to create a brand that minimised environmental impact, but that also gave back.


“Millions trying to do it [sustainability] imperfectly is so much better for the world than one person doing it perfectly. Nobody can be one hundred percent sustainable, but just get started,” Willow said to a crowd gathered at the Raw Assembly sustainable material sourcing event last year in Melbourne. “Compared to our parents’ generation we buy three more times clothes and 80 percent of the clothes we buy end up in landfill. Buy quality clothes and wear them longer," she urged guests.


Kit designs with desirability, longevity and mendability in mind. Collections feature natural and organic textiles like hemp, cotton and flax;  buttons made from corozo nut shells;  up-cycled polyester; metal from spent bullet casings sourced in Cambodia; buckles made from reclaimed horn; as well as ethically manufactured materials from artisans across India. Every part of the design and manufacturing process, including the clothing labels and compostable packaging, is devised with sustainability in mind.

“Millions trying to do it imperfectly is so much better for the world than three people doing it perfectly. Nobody can be one hundred percent sustainable. But just get started!”

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